Scrum guide на русском




Scrum guide на русском

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Definitive Kanban reference?

The Scrum Guide provides a concise, definitive guide to scrum. Is there such a guide available for Kanban?

3 Answers

I’ve never seen anything like what you’re looking for. I don’t think it’s likely to exist.

Kanban was originally developed as part of the Toyota Production System and just-in-time manufacturing. The canonical reference for TPS would probably be Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production, which was written by Taiichi Ohno, the creator of TPS. I learned about TPS mainly from The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World’s Greatest Manufacturer, and the author (Jeffrey K. Liker) has other books about TPS and Toyota as well.

Real-World Kanban: Do Less, Accomplish More with Lean Thinking is also easily digestible and provides theory and practice around using Kanban. I picked up a copy, but having already learned TPS and lean software development, I don’t think it added a whole lot. Some of the case studies and real-world practices were interesting, though.

All of these are longer than The Scrum Guide, though. If you’re looking for something that short, I’m not sure you can find anything that does it justice.

If you are looking for good guides to the application of Kanban for knowledge work, especially software and IT, then the following are the must-read books —

«Kanban: Successful Evolutionary Change for Your Technology Business» by David Anderson. Published in 2010, this is also referred to as the ‘Blue book on Kanban’ — where David defined the «Kanban Method for knowledge work» — and is one of the most comprehensive descriptions of how and why Kanban should be used in all knowledge work. You can find it here.

«Kanban from the Inside» by Mike Burrows. This book expands on the agendas and values of the Kanban Method — and also provides a great insight on how to implement Kanban using the STATIK method — Systems Thinking Approach to Implementing Kanban. You can get this here.

«Kanban and Scrum — making the most of both (Enterprise Software Development)» by Henrik Kniberg and Mattias Skarin — a good guide to using Scrum and Kanban together. Here is the link for it.

Besides these, there are a number of blogs which provide some great perspectives on the evolution of Kanban especially in the last 10 years. My company’s website also includes a fairly comprehensive guide to Kanban here, with specific sections on What is Kanban and Getting Started with Kanban.

Hope this helps!

The Scrum Guide was designed to be a structured, portable framework that could be lightly customized for each implementation. The Kanban Method is closer to a set of principles, and doesn’t even mandate a set of common artifacts—not even the uniquitious board and cards that many people consider synonymous with Kanban!

The Kanban Method

The closest you’re likely to get to a succinct guide is «The Principles of the Kanban Method», although it’s more akin to the Agile Manifesto than the Scrum Guide in terms of its level of detail.

If you’re looking for a set of principles for implementing the Kanban method as formulated by David J. Anderson, then that’s a key resource. Books on the topic generally have implementation examples, but because the framework is even less prescriptive than Scrum (in terms of ceremonies and artifacts) and less structured (by design), you’re going to be hard-pressed to find a Kanban guide that’s uncoupled from its implementation details, or that provides a comprehensive implementation guide.

The technical aspects of most books on Lean and Kanban focus on how to visualize the workflow, and on various calculations for queues, cycles, graphs, diagrams, and WIP limits. In other words, you get a lot of «how we implemented the principles for Project X» rather than a generic blueprint. This makes Kanban more flexible in some regards, but also less rigorous in other aspects.

If your question were closer to «Is there a commonly-referenced guide for implementing Kanban in industry X?» then it would still be tough to answer, but certainly more answerable. Kanban (as a general framework, rather than as an implementation) lacks the formal guidance you may have come to expect from other systems. This is largely by design.

See Also

General Resources

  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/a/21884/4271
  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/a/18599/4271
  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/kanban
  • Kanban by David J. Anderson
  • The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World’s Greatest Manufacturer

Additional Bibliography

If you want additional sources, look to the bibliographies and citations of other books in the field. The following is taken from the bibliography of Real-World Kanban by Mattias Skarin:

Диаграмма сгорания задач / Burndown Chart

В большинстве своем мы привыкли к графикам, идущим вверх, что означает положительную динамику. Однако они могут идти и вниз и также показывать положительную динамику. Одним из таких ярких примеров является «Диаграмма сгорания задач» (Burndown Chart). Само сочетание Burn Down дословно переводится как «гореть вниз» и, действительно, это так. Данный график является основным средством для отслеживания выполненных задач в спринте или во всём проекте. Хотя, по сути, он может использоваться как угодно, но мы его рассматриваем внутри методологии Scrum.

Пример Диаграммы сгорания задач:

Синим на диаграмме сгорания отмечена идеальная линия выполнения задач, на которую и следует опираться.

Красным отмечена реальная история выполнения задач.

По шкале Y отмечают количество запланированных баллов (в данном случае), идеальные часы, количество задач и так далее.

По шкале X отмечают количество дней до окончания Sprint.

Как может показаться на первый взгляд, данная «Диаграмма сгорания задач» (Burndown Chart) служит всего лишь для самоконтроля и самоотчета, однако её использование может рассказать об очень многом.

Читаем «Диаграмму сгорания задач» / Burndown Chart

Начнём с примеров негативных результатов как ведения графика, так и самой работы команды, и закончим более качественными.

1. Burndown Chart: Слишком рано

По «Диаграмме сгорания задач» (Burndown Chart) отчетливо видно, что команда все задачи выполнила раньше срока. Такая ситуация тоже не является позитивной, так как это означает ряд совершенных проблем:

  • Команда сделала неправильную оценку предстоящей работы;
  • В случае быстрого выполнения задач разработчики не добавляли задачи из следующего спринта;
  • Команда сильно перестраховалась, включив изначально дополнительный срок.

В случае такой проблемы чаще всего Scrum Master спрашивает команду о возможности добавления дополнительных задач из Product Backlog.

2. Burndown Chart: Опоздали

Также один из видов негативных диаграмм сгорания задач.

Одной из возможных причин здесь может быть постоянное добавление новых задач во время спринта, что увеличило нагрузку.

Второй частой проблемой является недоделанность задач, когда задачи сделаны наполовину. Такие задачи, как выразился Джефф Сазерленд, «являются хламом».

В такой ситуации на Daily Scrum Meeting обязательно нужно говорить о проблемах, мешающих идти к цели ровной дорогой. Как только линия реальных задач пошла выше, сразу надо решать проблему – это также один из постулатов методологии Scrum.

3. Burndown Chart: Без оценок

Может быть даже команда и работала, только забыла или не захотела использовать диаграмму сгорания задач, что является, прямо сказать, дурным тоном и противоречит эффективной работе. Команда не может контролировать себя, не может совершенствоваться и так далее.

4. Burndown Chart: Конечная оценка

Собственно, ситуация равна предыдущей. Несмотря на законченный Sprint, все итоговые оценки были внесены в диаграмму сгорания в самый последний день после завершения работы. Это равносильно тому, когда законченные задачи вообще не вносятся. По данному графику невозможно сделать выводы о правильности работы команды, и, даже более того, можно предположить, что команда не стремится к развитию.

5. Burndown Chart: Zero

Отсутствие показателя реальных задач в диаграмме не является поводом считать, что работа не производилась, ведь она могла быть просто не оценена. Как и в предыдущих пунктах, такая позиция не позволяет контролировать работу собственной команды и совершенствоваться.

6. Burndown Chart: Релаксирующая команда

Этот пример диаграммы сгорания задач уже значительно лучше, нежели другие, ведь в нём можно увидеть, как усовершенствовать команду. Возможные проблемы здесь такие же, как и в пункте «Слишком рано», но Scrum Team решили не заканчивать Sprint раньше, а более расслаблено продолжить работу, что также является ошибкой.

7. Burndown Chart: Совершенствование

Scrum Team на текущих показателях выглядит достаточно хорошо. По линиям видно, что в самом начале были трудности, но во время Daily Scrum Meeting все вопросы вскрывались и Scrum Master исправлял работу, ведя команду к цели.

Также, возможно, группа делала принципиальное ускорение для достижения цели.

Ещё одной причиной, к примеру, может быть то, что команда брала дополнительные задачи.

8. Burndown Chart: Опыт

Налицо опытная группа, которая после начала работы сразу преодолевает все возникающие трудности и совершенствуется так, что резко переходит к активному сжиганию.

9. Burndown Chart: A++

Бесконечно можно смотреть на три вещи: как горит огонь, как течёт вода и как строится идеальный график =).

Scrum Sprint

Диаграмма сгорания задач является главным показателем для Scrum Sprint. Выполнение задач во время Спринта, должно всегда оцениваться и контролироваться диаграммой сгорания задач.

Product Backlog

Правильно составленный беклог, приведет соответственно к правильному Sprint Backlog. Грамотный Sprint Backlog построит самую идеальную диаграмму сгорания задач.

Daily Scrum Meeting

Чтобы не упускать график диаграммы сгорания задач, необходимо каждый день проводить анализ работы и самое главное — анализ проблем. Для этого и придуман механизм Daily Scrum Meeting.

Scrum Team

Эффективность команды отображается на таких показателях, как Velocity и Burndown Chart. Чем идеальней диаграмма сгорания задач, тем более эффективно работает Scrum Team, так как это прямой показатель.

Scrum Master

Основной инструмент для Scrum Master — диаграмма сгорания задач. На данном графике Scrum Master однозначно может увидеть все проблемы и успехи команды.

Система управления проектами по методологии Scrum

Scrum guide на русском

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Definitive Kanban reference?

The Scrum Guide provides a concise, definitive guide to scrum. Is there such a guide available for Kanban?

3 Answers

I’ve never seen anything like what you’re looking for. I don’t think it’s likely to exist.

Kanban was originally developed as part of the Toyota Production System and just-in-time manufacturing. The canonical reference for TPS would probably be Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production, which was written by Taiichi Ohno, the creator of TPS. I learned about TPS mainly from The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World’s Greatest Manufacturer, and the author (Jeffrey K. Liker) has other books about TPS and Toyota as well.

Real-World Kanban: Do Less, Accomplish More with Lean Thinking is also easily digestible and provides theory and practice around using Kanban. I picked up a copy, but having already learned TPS and lean software development, I don’t think it added a whole lot. Some of the case studies and real-world practices were interesting, though.

All of these are longer than The Scrum Guide, though. If you’re looking for something that short, I’m not sure you can find anything that does it justice.

If you are looking for good guides to the application of Kanban for knowledge work, especially software and IT, then the following are the must-read books —

«Kanban: Successful Evolutionary Change for Your Technology Business» by David Anderson. Published in 2010, this is also referred to as the ‘Blue book on Kanban’ — where David defined the «Kanban Method for knowledge work» — and is one of the most comprehensive descriptions of how and why Kanban should be used in all knowledge work. You can find it here.

«Kanban from the Inside» by Mike Burrows. This book expands on the agendas and values of the Kanban Method — and also provides a great insight on how to implement Kanban using the STATIK method — Systems Thinking Approach to Implementing Kanban. You can get this here.

«Kanban and Scrum — making the most of both (Enterprise Software Development)» by Henrik Kniberg and Mattias Skarin — a good guide to using Scrum and Kanban together. Here is the link for it.

Besides these, there are a number of blogs which provide some great perspectives on the evolution of Kanban especially in the last 10 years. My company’s website also includes a fairly comprehensive guide to Kanban here, with specific sections on What is Kanban and Getting Started with Kanban.

Hope this helps!

The Scrum Guide was designed to be a structured, portable framework that could be lightly customized for each implementation. The Kanban Method is closer to a set of principles, and doesn’t even mandate a set of common artifacts—not even the uniquitious board and cards that many people consider synonymous with Kanban!

The Kanban Method

The closest you’re likely to get to a succinct guide is «The Principles of the Kanban Method», although it’s more akin to the Agile Manifesto than the Scrum Guide in terms of its level of detail.

If you’re looking for a set of principles for implementing the Kanban method as formulated by David J. Anderson, then that’s a key resource. Books on the topic generally have implementation examples, but because the framework is even less prescriptive than Scrum (in terms of ceremonies and artifacts) and less structured (by design), you’re going to be hard-pressed to find a Kanban guide that’s uncoupled from its implementation details, or that provides a comprehensive implementation guide.

The technical aspects of most books on Lean and Kanban focus on how to visualize the workflow, and on various calculations for queues, cycles, graphs, diagrams, and WIP limits. In other words, you get a lot of «how we implemented the principles for Project X» rather than a generic blueprint. This makes Kanban more flexible in some regards, but also less rigorous in other aspects.

If your question were closer to «Is there a commonly-referenced guide for implementing Kanban in industry X?» then it would still be tough to answer, but certainly more answerable. Kanban (as a general framework, rather than as an implementation) lacks the formal guidance you may have come to expect from other systems. This is largely by design.

See Also

General Resources

  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/a/21884/4271
  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/a/18599/4271
  • https://pm.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/kanban
  • Kanban by David J. Anderson
  • The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World’s Greatest Manufacturer

Additional Bibliography

If you want additional sources, look to the bibliographies and citations of other books in the field. The following is taken from the bibliography of Real-World Kanban by Mattias Skarin:

Scrum guide на русском

I have learnt that a «Scrum Master» is the one who facilitates the «continuous improvement» process during a Sprint retrospective. From my experience the retrospective leads to improving the (testing) process itself, depending on the need of the team. That said, is it beneficial for a manual tester to go for Scrum Master certification? I understand that it is always good to learn new things, new methodologies. But, can a manual tester be a Scrum Master?

I found a similar question on the below link. however, I was not convinced and my focus is more on Certified Scrum master.

Thank you for you time!

2 Answers

Anybody can be the Scrum Master, just make sure the Scrum Master has no other conflict of interest roles as Product Owner, Manager or Stakeholder.

Personally I think testers have the potential to be great Scrum Masters, because:

  • Testers discover problems/defects, but often do not demand a certain solution. Its up-to the owners of the issue to find the best solution. This places us already in a sort of servant leader situation, which could lead to team to accept findings from a tester more easily then from a manager or a co-developer.
  • Focus on quality, also in processes. As testers often have a broader role. From requirements till deployment. Getting people out of their silos might be easier if you understand the full process end2end.
  • Continuous improvement should already by a part of your job, how do you prevent defects from reoccurring. This could also be applied to other parts of the SDLC.
  • Testers should be better at communication with different roles then for example developers. Since they have more interaction when escalating quality issues and or trying to reproduce issues. Testers should be able to communicate with Users, Managers, Developer and Stakeholders in their own language. Where most developers are just to technical and traditional project managers are not at all technical.

This are just somethings that come to mind. Getting the certification might be good reason for a team to let you try the Scrum Master role for a while in an existing team.

If your company already uses Scrum doing the certification is a good idea anyways. Understanding and improving your Scrum knowledge is good for any member of a Scrum team, I would advice anyone on a Scrum team to do a training, read a good Scrum book and or do the certifications.

Scrum guide на русском

I am new to Visual Studio Scrum 1.0 Template. Created a Team project with Scrum 1.0 Template. After that in TFS a Team work Item menu is having following work items

  1. Bug
  2. List item
  3. Impediment
  4. Product Backlog Item
  5. Shared Steps
  6. Sprint
  7. Task
  8. Test Status

however, in my organization another project is having some of additional work items like follow

  1. Code Review Item
  2. Release
  3. Acceptance Test
  4. Sprint Retrospective
  5. Sprint Backlog Task

Do we need to modify any setting in TFS Server to bring this above items? Please guide to proceed further.

2 Answers

«Code Review Item» might be in correlation with TFS Code review workflow. If so, it would require you to insert it in each new TeamProject for the while thing to be usable.

All other Work Item types do not ring any bell to me, so my best guess is that they are custom types.
In order for you to import them in your newly constructed TeamProject you need to have the latest Power tools installed.
Open VS and navigate to «Tools»>»Process Editor»>»Work Item Types»>»Export WIT». Select the old Team Project & export to your PC the XMLs that correspond to each of your missing types.
Once you are done, use «Import WIT» to insert these XMLs into your new TeamProject. This should do it.

Those other items must be from a different template. They’re not part of the Microsoft Scrum Template.